Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2248/6844
Title: Age aspects of habitability
Authors: Safonova, M
Murthy, J
Shchekinov, Yu. A
Keywords: Formation;Habitability;Photosynthesis;Planetary systems
Issue Date: Apr-2016
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Citation: International Journal of Astrobiology, Vol. 15, No. 02, pp. 93-105
Abstract: A ‘habitable zone’ of a star is defined as a range of orbits within which a rocky planet can support liquid water on its surface. The most intriguing question driving the search for habitable planets is whether they host life. But is the age of the planet important for its habitability? If we define habitability as the ability of a planet to beget life, then probably it is not. After all, life on Earth has developed within only ~800 Myr after its formation – the carbon isotope change detected in the oldest rocks indicates the existence of already active life at least 3.8 Gyr ago. If, however, we define habitability as our ability to detect life on the surface of exoplanets, then age becomes a crucial parameter. Only after life had evolved sufficiently complex to change its environment on a planetary scale, can we detect it remotely through its imprint on the atmosphere – the so-called biosignatures, out of which the photosynthetic oxygen is the most prominent indicator of developed (complex) life as we know it. Thus, photosynthesis is a powerful biogenic engine that is known to have changed our planet's global atmospheric properties. The importance of planetary age for the detectability of life as we know it follows from the fact that this primary process, photosynthesis, is endothermic with an activation energy higher than temperatures in habitable zones, and is sensitive to the particular thermal conditions of the planet. Therefore, the onset of photosynthesis on planets in habitable zones may take much longer time than the planetary age. The knowledge of the age of a planet is necessary for developing a strategy to search for exoplanets carrying complex (developed) life – many confirmed potentially habitable planets are too young (orbiting Population I stars) and may not have had enough time to develop and/or sustain detectable life. In the last decade, many planets orbiting old (9–13 Gyr) metal-poor Population II stars have been discovered. Such planets had had enough time to develop necessary chains of chemical reactions and may carry detectable life if located in a habitable zone. These old planets should be primary targets in search for the extraterrestrial life.
Description: Restricted Access
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2248/6844
ISSN: 1473-5504
???metadata.dc.rights???: © Cambridge University Press
???metadata.dc.relation.uri???: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1473550415000208
Appears in Collections:IIAP Publications

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